plays

The Hour is my new thing.  Just ordered the DVDs!

-SD

opening night at the gállery

opening night at the gállery

Fist of Fun : Series 1 : Episode 3 (commentary)

Rich: Post modern. That was post modern.

Stew: Wow.

Rich: You were wearing the same clothes you were wearing in the studio.

Stew: Amazing.

Fist of Fun : Series 1 : Episode 2 (commentary)

Stew: This is really good stuff isn’t it?

Fist of Fun : Series 1 : Episode 2 (commentary)

Stew: This is really good stuff isn’t it?

Fist of Fun : Series 1 : Episode 1 (commentary)

Stew: I was really pleased with this set, I think it’s really important to this series. It looks like we weren’t supposed to be on television, and that it’s been filmed in the bottom of the BBC or something like that. 
Rich: …So my shirt, and your hair, look at that. 

Fist of Fun : Series 1 : Episode 1 (commentary)

Stew: I was really pleased with this set, I think it’s really important to this series. It looks like we weren’t supposed to be on television, and that it’s been filmed in the bottom of the BBC or something like that. 

Rich: …So my shirt, and your hair, look at that. 

The rise of the anti-talk show

If “The Eric Andre Show” isn’t the darkest comedy on television, it’s surely the most poorly lighted. Its shadowy thrift-store design evokes a weirdly amusing mood of giddy, maniacal desperation. When not dying, Mr. Andre is typically destroying. He kicks his desk in half, punches himself and bull rushes his own band. As satirists go, he’s a kamikaze artist.

British detective show ‘Thorne’ goes deep into the dark

With ‘Thorne’ and other imports, you get the sense that the British do not underestimate their audiences and aim high with plot points and details, much like ‘Mad Men’ does here in the States.

The rise of the anti-talk show

If “The Eric Andre Show” isn’t the darkest comedy on television, it’s surely the most poorly lighted. Its shadowy thrift-store design evokes a weirdly amusing mood of giddy, maniacal desperation. When not dying, Mr. Andre is typically destroying. He kicks his desk in half, punches himself and bull rushes his own band. As satirists go, he’s a kamikaze artist.

British detective show ‘Thorne’ goes deep into the dark

With ‘Thorne’ and other imports, you get the sense that the British do not underestimate their audiences and aim high with plot points and details, much like ‘Mad Men’ does here in the States.

These are our television collections, Swatch Dog’s above (Freaks and Geeks has been lent out), and Judge Nutmeg’s below.  But they are growing…

Fist of Fun : Series 1 : Episode 1

Fist of Fun : Series 1 : Episode 1

Currently watching

Currently watching

How ‘Veep’ gets Washington

The real insight of the show is that the inevitable failure of everything does not come about because Meyer and her staff are buffoons. (Most of them aren’t.) What’s buffoonish is the system itself — the stupid and trivial media, the utter futility of trying to communicate sensible policy to an America that, unlike the country imagined by Aaron Sorkin, does not hang on every word uttered by its public servants.

Jeff Daniels adapts to the long hours of ‘The Newsroom’ life

“It’s very musical,” he said, sitting in a Hollywood diner in a white shirt and white shorts. Though polite and forthcoming, Daniels’ manner is businesslike. “Aaron’s not the first to do this type of dialogue. All the great ones since Shakespeare can write like that. But when it gets to that pace, it’s wonderful, very much like a piece of music.”

How British television has embraced the supernatural – on a budget

In an interview he [Being Human writer Toby Whithouse] told me: “So much horror is about suggestion. You’ll hear the monster scratching but you don’t see it, because what you imagine is infinitely more terrifying than any amount of CGI. When you’re working in TV with a small budget, that’s of considerable appeal.”

How ‘Veep’ gets Washington

The real insight of the show is that the inevitable failure of everything does not come about because Meyer and her staff are buffoons. (Most of them aren’t.) What’s buffoonish is the system itself — the stupid and trivial media, the utter futility of trying to communicate sensible policy to an America that, unlike the country imagined by Aaron Sorkin, does not hang on every word uttered by its public servants.

Jeff Daniels adapts to the long hours of ‘The Newsroom’ life

“It’s very musical,” he said, sitting in a Hollywood diner in a white shirt and white shorts. Though polite and forthcoming, Daniels’ manner is businesslike. “Aaron’s not the first to do this type of dialogue. All the great ones since Shakespeare can write like that. But when it gets to that pace, it’s wonderful, very much like a piece of music.”

How British television has embraced the supernatural – on a budget

In an interview he [Being Human writer Toby Whithouse] told me: “So much horror is about suggestion. You’ll hear the monster scratching but you don’t see it, because what you imagine is infinitely more terrifying than any amount of CGI. When you’re working in TV with a small budget, that’s of considerable appeal.”